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. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing john abernathy -- don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. >> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as
when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for most people it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of a test before they get a license. you did not always have to with a gun in many localities. >> craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. and from living with guns, a liberal pays for the second amendment. saturday night at 10:00 eastern. part of four days of non-fiction books and authors through christmas days. as the electoral college met monday, we spoke with a social studies teacher at pioneer high school in ann arbor, mich., about how she teaches the look for a process in use the c-span as a resource. >> tracie van newsom is a high school and social studies teacher. >> tracy is a high-school social studies and history teacher. fellow, and she is joining us on the phone. what is y
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
negotiations. all of us will have to get out of our company's films to make that happen. i am willing to do that and am hopeful that enough members of congress in both parties are willing to do that as well. we can solve these problems. but where the clock is really ticking right now, is on middle- class taxes. at the end of the year, middle class taxes that are currently in place are set to expire. middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. there are two things that can happen. if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically the up on january 1. every from -- every family will see their taxes go up on january 1. i assume that does not sound too good to you. that is like dell lump of coal you would get for christmas. a typical middle class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. that's for a typical family. it would be more for some folks. that's money a lot of families just can't afford to lose. that's less money to buy gas, less money to buy groceries. in some cases, it means tougher choices between paying the rent and s
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
have that in u.s. hands -- i would rather have that in u.s. hands. >> i think george washington summed it up best. keep strong american borders and stay out of other countries squabbles. what ever happened to our christian ethics and foundation? >> the biggest change in american foreign-policy since the republic was founded was the creation of nato in 1947. it was the point in time the united states said they would engage in other countries in our national interest. the previous 165 years of american history avoided those kinds of commitments. you can make your own decisions if it was smart. i think it was wise myself. it was a significant change in the orientation of american international engagements. that has been true since 1947. 65 years we have been engaged that involve the united states and the global leadership position. we want to leave or doing what to stay or do we want to alter? those are the decisions of the obama administration would face. when you do not have the kind of resources that allow you to do everything you want to do in commit to every engagement, what are the
to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speaker's put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we get it. the president won his re- election. we won ours. we have to now come together. here is our proposal to the speaker -- to the president that we were unwilling to give a year and a half ago. >> they know they need to put revenant on the table, but will you come back and give them the entitlement cuts? >> we will take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we are interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we do not see taxes go up on anybody, so we can engage in reform, get the economy going again. we're not playing a game. that offer yesterday was not serious. thank you. >> next, nancy pelosi answers fiscal cliff questions. this is about 20 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm h
. it used to be a staple of small- business lending. you have a track record, a clear plan, they will make you a loan on your ability to pursue that. that is gone. they are in the same boat. they cannot get the loan. >> i am curious from the small business perspective, i think small businesses are coming up a lot right now as we talk about tax rates and making sure you protect small businesses. do you feel the issue is the most crucial for small businesses, or is it things like financing the -- >> rates are important on the tax front for small companies, i think the most important things are having a long-term sense of the code and try to grapple with tax reform to simplify the code. a center of our own polling, yes, they do not like playing -- paying the tax rates. the bigger thing is the burden of complying with the tax code the half. you have to remember small business people pay taxes at individual rates. they do not populate their income the same way individuals do. they have to deal with the business side to see what their tax code is. they also pay the taxes themselves. like most wo
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
rather see us spending all of the money on infrastructure and then come back in five or 10 years and say, well, maybe then. we are spending the money on infrastructure. it is a weak argument. host: let's go to laura. caller: i have two comments to make. the first is, the bush tax cut entitlements were supposed to be temporary. i remember when they were argued, and as far as i'm concerned, republicans live at that time. they never intended it to be temporary. they intended it to starve the government, which is a constitutional government. that makes me very angry. the other point i have to make is that i'm one of the long- term unemployed. right now, all of these discussions are noise. the root cause problem is a lack of jobs and offshore in that has gone unchecked since 2000. if i do not have a job, i cannot contribute to my country. if i do not have a job, i cannot pursue life, liberty, and have it is. i cannot raise my child or pay for my house her i cannot do anything because there is no revenue coming in. all i hear are the republicans wining about the upper 2% not having their golf
to become competitors that try to crush us. >> a lot of people in this audience know a lot more about this issue than i do, so i want to go to the audience. before i do that, i want the three of you to take out your crystal balls and tell us, the next 12 months, what will happen on this issue? steve? >> i am cautiously optimistic. six months ago, it passed with broad bipartisan support. with they came together on that legislation because it was important to provide sbrures with capital even though they said nothing could get done, something did get done. the good news people recognize the issue is important and there is a general agreement on the solution around high skilled immigration. the problem is is the politics and the economy and jobs have been prumped by the politics of immigration. i think there are four paths. one could be the pass the senate not be taken up in the senate. there is a lottery that would flult raising the overall level of immigration. if there was an agreement to include that that bill could be passed. a second option which is what the president has ind indic
want you to go to washington and stand on your principal. i want you to fight for us. i say, i will. someone else will get up and say, i want you to compromise and find the middle ground and get things done. this is the 10th time this just happen to me. i say, that is exactly what they hired me to do, to figure out how we do both of those things. it is our job as representatives in congress, to fight for our values and the principles we believe in and still can something done. that is where we are right now. the divide we are facing right now -- i hope all parties understand we have serious challenges. we have created a moment in time with there are major fiscal and tax policies facing us at the end of the year. we need to make some decisions about how we are going to move forward. the democratic position on this is pretty clear. the president could not be more clear 3 the election. elections data. we -- the president could not have been more clear during the election. we picked up seats. we are willing to do spending cuts. how we do that should be discussed. we need some of the rev
. for us to move forward in this situation we are in ohio, we need not overreact to stories and we need to seek ways of getting all the participants in the political process to admit that it is easy to follow and that fraud is rare. until we can overcome those misperceptions, i think it will be very hard to get that balance of a swing state like ohio. thank you. [applause] >> with such an esteemed panel, i feel like i should announce my candidacy for indiana secretary of state. [laughter] then i think about all the academic writings i have does it law professor and what the opposition would do with those. i think i will not. i work in indiana and i will talk about indiana and our experience so far with photo identification. indiana is important nationally for a couple of reasons. we were just about first -- is there anybody from georgia in the room? if there isn't, indiana will take credit for being first in line on photo identification. as a requirement. also, india has served as the model -- indiana has served as the model for photo identification laws that have been passed and litiga
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15